Can You Spot the Errors?
Posted by June on March 20, 2017
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My recent column contains a little grammar quiz I hope people will enjoy. For the answers, head to the column here. The questions are in a spot-the-error format below. Note: Not every question has an error! Good luck!

1. The water skier water-skis on water skis.

2. The lengthy debate, which went on for hours, lead the council members to reject the measure.

3. Isabelle and Brie braided each others' hair.

4. Neither Joe nor his wife Christine are going to clean the garage.

5. I feel badly about the argument.

6. There have been reports of robbers in the area, so lets be more careful about locking the doors.

8. Jeremy wants to be a FBI agent.

Answers, with explanations, here. 

An Easy Fix for a Faulty Parallel
Posted by June on March 13, 2017
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Some faulty parallels can be fixed very easily by inserting "and."

For example, if can you spot the faulty parallel in the following sentence you can probably see where an "and" would fix it:

The program addresses the energy needs of a wide range of industries including healthcare, data centers, commercial real estate, warehouses, hotels, heavy and light industry.

Here's more on the subject in a column I wrote.

Some Thoughts on 'Only'
Posted by June on March 6, 2017
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Do you only work with licensed professionals? Or do you work only with licensed professionals? Perhaps you work with only licensed professionals?

There's a popular myth that says two of these are errors. Happily, the language isn't so rigid. But precision use of "only" could help your reader get your meaning. Here's a column I did recently that should help.

McIntyre's featured word: embouchure
Posted by June on March 1, 2017
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If you don't check in on John McIntyre from time to time, you miss a lot. Sometimes he features new vocab words that, I'll confess, I've never heard before.

I'll give you a hint about what embouchure means: It involves the lips. But for the full definition, you'll want to go straight to the horse's mouth. Here's McIntyre's post.